Gavin E. Arteel, PhD
Professor of Medicine

Dr. Bell
Dr. Arteel is a Professor and Associate Chief of Basic Science, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

Office Location:
BST W1143
200 Lothrop St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Contact Information:
Office Telephone: 412-648-4187
Emails: gearteel@pitt.edu

Research Interests

Our group is investigating the magnitude and impact of the changes to the hepatic matrisome in the context of the development and recovery from liver disease. As the main detoxifying organ in the body, the liver has tremendous ability to heal and regenerate from injury. The regenerative response in the liver can be perturbed and impacts recovery from injury or damage. The extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of a diverse range of components that work bi-directionally with surrounding cells to create a dynamic microenvironment that regulates cell signaling, recruitment, and tissue function. The basic definition of the ECM comprises fibrillar proteins (e.g., collagens, glycoproteins and proteoglycans). More recently, groups have extended the definition to include ECM affiliated proteins, regulator/modifier proteins and secreted factors (i.e., the ; 'matrisome'). Quantitative and qualitative changes to the ECM structure and superstructure can impact overall health of the organ and organism. Remodeling of the hepatic ECM/matrisome in response to injury is well understood in some contexts. For example, changes to the ECM associated with fibrosis are considered almost synonymous with hepatic ECM changes. Proteomic-based studies in other organs haves demonstrated that the matrisome responses dynamically in composition after insult well before fibrotic changes to the organ. These changes to the ECM may not alter overall ECM architecture and are therefore histologically undetectable. Nevertheless, these changes have potential to alter hepatic phenotype and function. These acute responses can be viewed as an arm of the wound healing response and facilitate recovery from damage, which resolves once the damage is repaired. However, under conditions of chronic injury, these changes likely contribute to activation of a significant remodeling response that leads to scar formation (i.e., fibrosis). It is our goal to better understand this process, as well as to develop minimally-invasive biomarkers to predict interindividual risk.

Selected Publications

View Dr. Arteel's publications on PubMed (*= Trainee)

  1. *Massey VL, *Dolin CE, *Poole LG, *Hudson SV, Siow DL, Brock GN, Merchant ML, Wilkey DW, Arteel GE. The hepatic "matrisome" responds dynamically to injury: Characterization of transitional changes to the extracellular matrix in mice. Hepatology. 2017 Mar;65(3):969-982. PMCID: PMC5319876.
  2. *Hudson SV, Miller HA, Mahlbacher GE, Saforo D, Beverly LJ, Arteel GE**, Frieboes HB**. Computational/experimental evaluation of liver metastasis post hepatic injury: interactions with macrophages and transitional ECM. Sci Rep. 2019 Oct 21;9(1):15077. PMCID: PMC6803648. (**Joint senior authors)
  3. Bataller R, Arteel GE, Moreno C, Shah V. Alcohol-related liver disease: Time for action. J Hepatol. 2019 Feb;70(2):221-222. PMCID: PMC6416779.
  4. Arteel GE, Naba A. The liver matrisome - looking beyond collagens. JHEP Rep. 2020 Apr 18;2(4):100115. PMCID: PMC7330160
  5. *Bergheim I, *Guo L, *Davis MA, *Lambert JC, *Beier JI, Duveau I, Luyendyk, JP, Roth RA, Arteel GE. Metformin prevents alcohol-induced liver injury in the mouse: Critical role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Gastroenterology. 2006 Jun;130(7):2099-112. PMCID: PMC2648856.
  6. *Beier JI, Luyendyk JP, *Guo L, *von Montfort C, Staunton DE, Arteel GE. Fibrin accumulation plays a critical role in the sensitization to lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury caused by ethanol in mice. Hepatology. 2009 May;49(5):1545-53. PMCID: PMC2852109.
  7. *Massey VL, *Dolin CE, *Poole LG, *Hudson SV, Siow DL, Brock GN, Merchant ML, Wilkey DW and Arteel GE. The hepatic "matrisome" responds dynamically to injury: characterization of transitional changes to the extracellular matrix. Hepatology. 2017 Mar;65(3):969-982. PMCID: PMC5319876.
  8. *Hudson SV, Miller HA, Mahlbacher GE, Saforo DS, Beverly LJ, Arteel GE**, Frieboes HB** Computational/experimental evaluation of liver metastasis post hepatic injury: interactions with macrophages and transitional ECM. Sci Rep. 2019 Oct 21;9(1). PMCID: PMC6803648. (**Joint senior authors).